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Port Security

A number of major ports around the world including Sydney, operate under a heightened sense of security awareness.

Port Authority of New South Wales has always taken port security and safety seriously. With 99 per cent of Australia's international trade transported by sea, Sydney's ports are pivotal to Australia's economic future, handling more than $50 billion of international and domestic trade annually.

In response to the risk of terrorism, the Commonwealth Government has interpreted the International Ship and Port Facility and Security (ISPS) Code, through its introduction of the Maritime Transport And Offshore Facilities Security Act (MTOFSA) and Offshore Facilities Security Regulation 2003. In June 2004, the Commonwealth Office of Transport Security (OTS) approved Port Authority of New South Wales maritime security plans for Sydney Harbour and Botany Bay, compliant with MTOFSA and the ISPS Code.

In addition to Port Authority of New South Wales maritime security plans, foreign and Australian trading vessels, many port facilities and port service providers also have maritime security plans.

In Port Botany, the facilities that are required to have maritime security plans under the MTOFSA are the DP World and Patrick container terminals, Caltex Kurnell jetty/berths and Port Authority of New South Wales Bulk Liquids Berth.

In the port of Sydney Harbour, facilities that are required to have maritime security plans under the MTOFSA are: Sydney Harbour, Barangaroo 5, Overseas Passenger Terminal at Circular Quay, Glebe Island / White Bay and Shell Gore Cove.

Increased security measures include establishing forums for information sharing between Government Agencies and regulated port users; new and upgraded fencing and gates; restricted access to sensitive areas; background checking of port workers through the introduction of the Maritime Security Identification Card (MSIC); signage; access control; increased closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance; perimeter patrols; and increased monitoring of port precincts, particularly the waterside.

Download the Port Authority of New South Wales Port Security Advice, which explains the Water-side restricted zones established in both ports.